A Miraculous Transformation?

I used to respond to–get triggered by–the noise and crowds in airports. I would feel tense and stressed, and would spend energy trying to block out my awareness of what was happening around me. I would arrive home exhausted.

After a Logosynthesis session when I thought nothing had happened, I spent the next day flying home and did not even notice the hubbub. I can remember my previous upset and exhaustion, but I have now gone 8 years without reacting that way.

When a partner in a workshop helped me identify a target for releasing my upset about air travel, I had a vague memory of a scene when I was 8-years-old and in a New York subway train at rush-hour. I experienced "being squished."

I didn't even remember that part of my work until several years later when I found some notes from the session. All I knew was that I responded very differently to air travel.

The explanation for this (what seemed to me) miraculous transformation is that I had frozen my energy during that overwhelming experience when I was 8-years-old and had already learned to act like a “good girl” and not show my feelings.

By saying the 3 Logosynthesis sentences, I had reclaimed my frozen energy.

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on Page 82 of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.) You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com, where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.

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Tracking Your Own Story

Sometimes it is hidden in plain view but you can't see it until someone points it out to you. Fortunately, that happened to me when I was about 30.

I was attending a meeting of professionals for the first time and stumbled over someone's protruding feet as I approached my seat.

"I'm sorry. I'm just so clumsy." was my automatic response.

One of the senior people at the meeting, that was partially about the stories we create, asked a question that illuminated a story that I was completely unaware of. He asked, "Who told you you were clumsy?"

Until that moment, I had simply assumed that I really was clumsy. After all, nobody ever wanted me on their team when I was in school. I was the one who dropped the ball or never managed to catch it in the first place. And I never could manage to climb the neighborhood climbing tree.

Once I thought about the answer I realized that my father and other members of my family had been teasing me and laughing at me for being clumsy ever since I was a small child. I adopted their story about me and accepted it as truth.

Much later, after I had finally learned some physical skills, I learned that many people need to be taught those physical skills and that my abilities were well within the normal range. I was not especially clumsy after all.

Are you accepting as truth limiting stories that you created from an uninformed experience in your past? Listening to your own language and assumptions may help you to recognize it.

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on Page 48 of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.) You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com, where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.

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There Is So Much More

Stress and anxiety relief can often be a do-it-yourself project. For many simple things you encounter, all you need is to learn, and practice using, tools like the ones offered in this book.

And yesterday I was reminded of what incredible work people have been doing in this field to help people who are so traumatized by stress that they can barely function. I spent the day attending a virtual workshop with Peter A. Levine, Ph.D., developer of Somatic Experiencing, a body focused treatment for toxic stress.

His work, the work of Bessel Van der Kolk, M.D., and others on the cutting edge of this field have so much to offer and so much to teach about healing that I am awed. This field is certainly worth many lifetimes of study and I am thrilled to learn more about how many different areas are being carefully examined.

If you are someone who struggles to maintain your equilibrium on a moment by moment basis, please seek the help of an experienced therapist who is integrating and applying the information in Logosynthesis or one of the other developing fields. Healing is definitely possible and does not need to involve indefinite drug use.

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on Page 19 of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.) You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com, where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.

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