Instead of Control

Most processes of guided self-change like coaching, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and many self-help books are about learning to control your behavior.

You are encouraged to choose goals and behave in ways to help you achieve your goals. If you’re not doing the right thing, you’re supposed to change that behavior and do something that is more effective in helping you move in your chosen direction.

This is very useful when it works, but unfortunately, most of the time it only works for a short time. That's because it addresses only one small part of who you really are. Your logical self.

The larger part of who you are consists of your emotional self. Some systems call that part the elephant while your logical side is the rider. It is a great analogy showing the different power of each part.

It is hard to move an elephant in a direction the elephant does not want to go!!!

So how can we help the elephant change its mind and want something different? That’s where Logosynthesis, the process taught in this book comes in. There is a core Self to each one of us that knows what we need. Most of the time we ignore that still, small voice.

Learn this process to let your Self direct your lasting growth. 

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on Page 116of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.) You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com, where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.

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Inventing Chapter One

Writing may be an addiction. It's about being addicted to the incredible feeling that comes from helping you, my reader, improve your life. The more readers I reach, the better I feel.

Writing a book only happens when there is something important that I understand and that I know you and many others don't. I want all of you to know what it is and use it to transform some part of your lives.

My first challenge is to convince you that I have something really useful for you and that it will be worth your time to learn about it. So, in the very first few words, I need to intrigue you. In this book I do that by reminding you of a problem in your life that you would love to solve–in this case, how to stop feeling so anxious.

Then I need to convince you that I have a useful way to help you solve that problem.

What better way to do this than to tell you a story about myself and how I solved a similar problem. That also gives me a way to introduce myself and help you feel hopeful that I can actually help you.

That’s what the first chapter is for. Then I need to build each succeeding chapter to fulfill my promise.

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on Page 20 of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.) You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com, where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.

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It Takes a Village…

It takes a village, or at least a team, to produce a book and to do lots of other things.

There are some things that I can do myself, but they are easier and work better when I have support. So if you are trying to be strong instead of asking for help in any area, keep reading.

Many months ago, my primary care physician discovered that my EKG was problematic. I have always taken very good care of myself and I was shocked.

I shared the information with my husband and a very few good friends. Months later when the Cardiologist decided I needed to have a scary (to me) procedure, my inclination was to keep it to myself and a few close friends.

I struggled and finally found myself writing and sharing about it in a writing group.

The outpouring of loving support was overwhelming. That gave me courage to share with others and ask for their support.

The experience was amazing. Knowing how love surrounded me helped me move peacefully through the process. It worked! I am better and with far more energy than I have had in a long time. And I am so grateful!

So, when you need help, let your village know. Chances are that they will be there for you too!

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on Page 129 of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.) You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com, where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.

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