Protection Matters

When have you been in  stressful situation? Did you have the resources you needed to resolve the problem or did you close down a part of yourself for self-protection?

I still remember a scene from my pediatrician's office when I was 4 or 5 years old. I was terrified at the prospect of the nurse pricking my finger to get a drop of blood!

I screamed and balled my hands into tight fists. I buried my face in my mother's midsection.

Finally the situation was resolved when the nurse uncurled a finger and got the sample without my even noticing. I was too busy screaming.

When I was told it was over, I remember being surprised. I don't remember any further scenes ever, even when I had a series of allergy shots.

I had the help and protection I needed to eventually manage that situation. But WHAT IF???

What if my mother had not been both sympathetic and loving?

What if she or the nurse had yelled at me to shut up?

What if I had been alone with the nurse?

In any of those situations I could easily have been overwhelmed by something an adult would consider a minor inconvenience.

If you were not protected, your energy may still be stuck in an incident you barely remember.

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on Page 33-36 of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.)

You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.

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What’s Your Story?

Emily's story is really about who she is and what she needs to do to have a right to be in the world.

We all create stories that explain the world to us when we are children. Some are more or less benign like "I will grow up, get married and live happily ever after." But even that simple story line can be pretty limiting when it does not match the reality of having to work at any relationship to make it successful.

Other stories are less happy. This might be "I will need to work hard for every single thing I get and never have time for fun." Some are even tragic like "I will die young just like my father did."

In every case the story helps guide decisions you make about how to live your everyday life and limits your options.

What story do you tell yourself about your life? Is it "I need to keep my feelings to myself?" or perhaps, "I would lose my friends if I did not do what they expect?" or perhaps, "I can't afford to take a vacation?" Whatever it is, consider giving it up and making fresh choices with more possibilities.

The information about how to reclaim your energy from your stories will help.

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on Page 68 of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.)

You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.

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Evolving This Book

How can I explain this astonishingly simple, profound experience in a way that makes it possible for a naive reader to take this strange new concept and actually use it?

I pondered this question for a full year after I was asked to write a Logosynthesis book for a general audience.  I wanted to create a user-friendly experience that bridged several cultures because this process is much better known in Europe than it is in the US.

And I wanted my audience to know the good news that transformation no longer needs to be painful.

Since I actually had been teaching this process for several years, I had developed a process that my students seemed to like. But that process involved being able to tell about my own experiences while encouraging those students to try the process themselves and adapting it to each one's prior experience. 

How could those students experiences be translated into a useful form?

Finally I asked for help–on Facebook–and volunteers from 7 different countries joined my “Little Logosynthesis Book” team and agreed to read and comment on each chapter I created. With their help, this book emerged.

I was thrilled when early readers affirmed that together we created a practical and usable book that actually guides the reader to experience this potentially life-changing process.

This paragraph is a comment I wrote about a passage on the first page of Letting It Go: Relieve Anxiety and Toxic Stress in Just a Few Minutes Using Only Words (Rapid Relief with Logosynthesis®.)

You can see the passage in the book. You can also see the excerpt here. This link will take you to Bublish.com where I regularly publish comments on parts of this book. This is a site where authors share of their work. You can subscribe to my musings, there, as well as to the musings of many other authors. It’s a great place to learn about new books and I recommend that you visit.

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